Theology of Culture

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COURSE OVERVIEW
“In these lectures, I characterize radical theology as a theology of the God beyond God. I take my point of departure from Paul Tillich, who is I propose the father of radical theology, and move on to two critical appropriations of Tillich, by Mary Daly and James Cone. I conclude by venturing into the “post-human” and speculating on what room there is, if any, for God and theology.” John D. Caputo

Each lecture is given by Dr. John D. Caputo as he engages a specific thinker and text, while seeking to raise a robust challenge to the God of traditional theism. The readings have been selected to address the focus of each session and give the reader an encounter with each thinker’s most powerful prose. Following the lecture, there is a livestreamed discussion of the texts and themes explored.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTORS
Dr. Tripp Fuller is the founder and host of the #1 theology podcast, Homebrewed Christianity. As an author, speaker, podcaster, and professional theologian he is committed to bringing the best resources from the academy to the church so we can brew a more robust faith today.

John D. Caputo is a hybrid philosopher/theologian who works in the area of radical theology. Prof. Caputo has spearheaded a notion he calls “weak theology,” by which he means a “poetics” of the “event” that is harbored in the name (of) God, or that “insists” in the name (of) “God,” a notion that depends upon a reworking of the notions of event in Derrida to theological ends. In his majors works he has argued that interpretation goes all the way down (Radical Hermeneutics, 1987), that Derrida is a thinker to be reckoned with by theology (The Prayers and Tears of Jacques Derrida, 1997), that theology is best served by getting over its love affair with power and authority and embracing what Caputo calls, taking a phrase from St. Paul, The Weakness of God: A Theology of the Event (2006), which won the American Academy of Religion award for excellence in the category of constructive theology.

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Theology of Culture

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COURSE OVERVIEW
“In these lectures, I characterize radical theology as a theology of the God beyond God. I take my point of departure from Paul Tillich, who is I propose the father of radical theology, and move on to two critical appropriations of Tillich, by Mary Daly and James Cone. I conclude by venturing into the “post-human” and speculating on what room there is, if any, for God and theology.” John D. Caputo

Each lecture is given by Dr. John D. Caputo as he engages a specific thinker and text, while seeking to raise a robust challenge to the God of traditional theism. The readings have been selected to address the focus of each session and give the reader an encounter with each thinker’s most powerful prose. Following the lecture, there is a livestreamed discussion of the texts and themes explored.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTORS
Dr. Tripp Fuller is the founder and host of the #1 theology podcast, Homebrewed Christianity. As an author, speaker, podcaster, and professional theologian he is committed to bringing the best resources from the academy to the church so we can brew a more robust faith today.

John D. Caputo is a hybrid philosopher/theologian who works in the area of radical theology. Prof. Caputo has spearheaded a notion he calls “weak theology,” by which he means a “poetics” of the “event” that is harbored in the name (of) God, or that “insists” in the name (of) “God,” a notion that depends upon a reworking of the notions of event in Derrida to theological ends. In his majors works he has argued that interpretation goes all the way down (Radical Hermeneutics, 1987), that Derrida is a thinker to be reckoned with by theology (The Prayers and Tears of Jacques Derrida, 1997), that theology is best served by getting over its love affair with power and authority and embracing what Caputo calls, taking a phrase from St. Paul, The Weakness of God: A Theology of the Event (2006), which won the American Academy of Religion award for excellence in the category of constructive theology.